Dr. David Lackey: Professor, Reader, Woodworker

Dr. David Lackey: Professor, Reader, Woodworker

Dean of the School of Theology; College Faculty/Professor, Bible, Theology

Years of Teaching Experience: 33
Education: M.Div., MRE, Th.M. and Ed.D. From Temple Baptist Seminary; D.Min. from Baptist Bible Seminary
Hobbies: Woodworking, reading, exercising
Recent Reads: “The Few” by Ales Kershaw, and a festschrift honoring Charles Ryrie, John Walvoord and J. Dwight Pentecost
Favorite Class to Teach: Minor Prophets
Little Known Fact: “I sang bass in the Singing Men of Temple for four years.”
Family Influence: “My dad was my first pastor and the one preaching when I got saved. He modeled being truly scriptural in an otherwise militant fundamental environment. He was a college professor for 16 years at TTU and my pastor in various churches for most of that time. My mom was the quiet, reserved, Southern lady behind the scenes who helped keep my feet on the floor. My wife has been the same source of quiet wisdom (as my mom) for the last 40 years also. She has been the perfect complement for my shortcomings.”
What has Teaching Taught You? “Teaching is content from a source passing through an environment to a student. All of these are imperfect. I must attempt to remove as many imperfections as possible from my content and me as the source. The environment is frequently out of my hands but must be managed to be more conducive for learning. I must learn to be tolerant of all of the potential imperfections in these things because they exist in me as well. Since I teach the Bible, it is incredible that God would accommodate Himself to such human frailty to produce Christlikeness in students.”
Why do you Teach? “I teach for three reasons: I have the ultimate content in Scripture that has the answer to everything—a truth that is more vivid to me every year. I want to be the same kind of change agent in other lives as many were in mine. I want to be the good thing people are learning since we are all students always learning (both good and bad).”

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