Select Page

High School Dual Enrollment

Get a jump start on earning college credits as a high school student—on campus or online.

Accelerate your learning

High School Dual Enrollment at CSU

Gain the same course benefits as college students and top preparation for further higher education success at a fully accredited, Christ-centered university.

Your time is valuable. Dual enrollment can help you maximize your time and put you a step ahead of average high school students. With dual enrollment, you’ll earn college credits as you fulfill your high school requirements.

You can take a single class, several classes or complete 30 credits over your entire junior and senior years.

Prepare for the next level

Gain top preparation for further higher education success by completing university-level classes with a Christ-centered focus.

Dual enrollment gives you experience in higher level learning, preparing you to reach your future academic goals and proving your capacity for higher-level learning, which will reflect well on your resume and college applications.

Save money

Dual enrollment cost is an unparalleled value at just $150 for each credit hour ($450 per 3-credit class—a significant savings over traditional tuition costs).

Even better: You can get ALL YOUR TUITION MONEY BACK in the form of a scholarship when you attend Clarks Summit University as an on-campus student and graduate from CSU with a bachelor’s degree.

A successful dual enrolled student should…

  • Be willing to ask for help
  • Demonstrate patience and persistence
  • Show signs of maturity and responsibility
  • Utilize a computer effectively
  • Sharpen time-management
  • Work ahead and be proactive
  • Sustain independence and initiative

Online courses offered Fall 2021

See the catalog for course descriptions.

Session 1: August 16–October 8

Introduction to Humanities [AR210; 3 credits]
Carleigh Smith
An introductory exploration of the humanities through the examination and discussion of select artistic, literary and philosophic works of Western civilization. Students will exercise hermeneutic, critical thinking, and communication skills, while laboring to uncover the power of these works and texts to express and/or form a worldview. Ultimately, students will confront their own worldviews in light of these competing visions of reality in order to better understand, embrace and share the Christian worldview.

Principles of Bible Study [BI100; 3 credits]
Diane Lytle
An introduction to various tools of Bible study and a methodical and inductive approach to study of the Scriptures, basic laws, and principles of interpretation.  This course includes opportunities to practice using the tools, methods, and principles.

Bible Survey [BI111; 3 credits]
Paul Golden
This course surveys the Old and New Testament. Major dates, events, characters, theological passages, and themes are studied from Genesis to Revelation.

The Church’s Ministry [EM200; 3 credits]
Dr. William Higley
A study of God’s corporate purpose for and design of the church, special attention is given to the value and necessity of edification and outreach being accomplished through a community of saints. The church’s activity in education, worship, fellowship, evangelism, and missions is considered.

Academic and Researched Writing [EN121; 3 credits]
Britney Sewall
This course is designed to enable the student to communicate clearly and effectively in written and spoken word. Emphasis is on academic writing style, employing rhetorical strategies, and the processes for researching and writing.

Writing Across the Disciplines [EN122; 3 credits]
Britney Sewall
This writing course presents an overview of reading, discussion, and writing throughout various academic disciplines. The coursework seeks to strengthen reading and writing skills and establishes connections among biblical studies, psychology, literature, and other areas of the humanities.

World Religions [EV220; 3 credits]
Dr. Paul McGinniss
This is a survey of the history, doctrine, and philosophy of major non-Christian belief systems. The presentation of the Gospel to meet the unique needs of each group will be emphasized. An analysis of each belief system in reference to its cultural, political, and geographical setting is developed during the semester. The student will have an understanding of the world religions studies and be able to analyze other religious systems in a systematic manner. Also, appropriate evangelistic methods for each religion/worldview will be considered.

History of Western Civilization & Thought I [HI111; 3 credits]
Jessica Preusser
This course is an introduction to the seminal events, ideas, thinkers, and works of our Western civilization. The primary means of investigation will be direct interaction with poetic, political, and philosophic texts in the light of Divine revelation granted us in Scripture. Underlying ideas, which influence deeds, will be our focus as we examine the flow of history and thought from the creation account in Genesis through the Greco-Roman World to the beginning of the Modern Era.

American History I [HI205; 3 credits]
David Muse
This course is a survey of United States history from pre-Colonial times through the Reconstruction Era of 1877. Special attention is focused on the social, intellectual, and cultural threads of American history.

Living Well [HP101; 1 credit]
Sherrie Holloway
This course is designed to provide students with a better understanding of the mechanics and components of wellness as it relates to the biblical principle of body stewardship. The intent of this course is to help each student realize and practice the value and role of wellness on a philosophical, physiological, psychological and personal level.

Walking/Jogging [PE115; 1 credit]
Sherrie Holloway
The course is designed to give the student an understanding of and a proficiency in walking and jogging for fitness.  The course content includes instruction about correct technique/form, training principles, equipment (clothing & shoes, pedometers, etc),

General Psychology [PS100; 3 credits]
Faye Moore
An introduction to the field of psychology as a scientific discipline concerned with the study of behavior and cognitive processes. Included is a survey of fields such as biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, motivation and emotion, cognition, development, personality, intelligence, social behavior, abnormal behavior, and counseling.

Physical Science Survey [SC200; 3 credits]
Jonathan Henry
This course is introduction to the fundamentals of matter and energy, emphasizing the Biblical teaching of literal six-day creation for interpreting scientific data.

Building a Biblical Lifestyle [TH120; 3 credits]
Dr. Dwight Peterson
This course helps the student to develop a philosophy and strategy of godly living that will guide him or her for a lifetime.  These foundational concepts for successful Christian living include developing a Biblical world view, ethics and patterns of behavior; Bible study; prayer; and making Biblically-informed choices.

Theology Survey [TH211; 3 credits]
Dr. Ken Pyne
This course surveys eight of the major divisions of theology- the doctrines of the Bible, God, Christ, Holy Spirit, Man, Sin, Salvation, and Angels (includes Satan and demons).

Session 2: October 18–December 10

Principles of Bible Study [BI100; 3 credits]
Diane Lytle
An introduction to various tools of Bible study and a methodical and inductive approach to study of the Scriptures, basic laws, and principles of interpretation.  This course includes opportunities to practice using the tools, methods, and principles.

Bible Survey [BI111; 3 credits]
Paul Crichton
This course surveys the Old and New Testament. Major dates, events, characters, theological passages, and themes are studied from Genesis to Revelation.

World Religions [EV220; 3 credits]
Dr. Darryl Meekins
This is a survey of the history, doctrine, and philosophy of major non-Christian belief systems. The presentation of the Gospel to meet the unique needs of each group will be emphasized. An analysis of each belief system in reference to its cultural, political, and geographical setting is developed during the semester. The student will have an understanding of the world religions studies and be able to analyze other religious systems in a systematic manner. Also, appropriate evangelistic methods for each religion/worldview will be considered.

History of Western Civilization and Thought II [HI112; 3 credits]
Susan Cagley
This course is an introduction to the seminal events, ideas, thinkers, and works of our Western civilization. The primary means of investigation will consist of sustained interaction with primary texts in the light of divine revelation granted in Scripture. Ideas which influence deeds will be our focus as we examine our Western heritage from A.D. 1500 to our present century.

Living Well [HP101; 1 credit]
Sherrie Holloway
This course is designed to provide students with a better understanding of the mechanics and components of wellness as it relates to the biblical principle of body stewardship. The intent of this course is to help each student realize and practice the value and role of wellness on a philosophical, physiological, psychological and personal level.

General Psychology [PS100; 3 credits]
Faye Moore
An introduction to the field of psychology as a scientific discipline concerned with the study of behavior and cognitive processes. Included is a survey of fields such as biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning, motivation and emotion, cognition, development, personality, intelligence, social behavior, abnormal behavior, and counseling.

Earth Science Survey [SC202; 3 credits]
Jonathan Henry
This course is a study of the fundamentals of geology and astronomy, emphasizing the Biblical teaching of a literal six-day creation and a universal flood for interpreting scientific data.

Building a Biblical Lifestyle [TH120; 3 credits]
Dr. Dwight Peterson
This course helps the student to develop a philosophy and strategy of godly living that will guide him or her for a lifetime.  These foundational concepts for successful Christian living include developing a Biblical world view, ethics and patterns of behavior; Bible study; prayer; and making Biblically-informed choices.

Theology Survey [TH211; 3 credits]
Dan Price
This course surveys eight of the major divisions of theology- the doctrines of the Bible, God, Christ, Holy Spirit, Man, Sin, Salvation, and Angels (includes Satan and demons)

Session 3: August 23–December 15

Introduction to Business [BA102; 3 credits]
Dr. David Ober 
This course provides a foundational overview of various business functions and competencies, such as management, global competition, ethics, marketing, technology, leadership and motivation.

Frequently Asked Questions about High School Dual Enrollment

What is High School Dual Enrollment?

A program that allows high school students to take classes at the college level, which gives them the possibility of dual credit.

What are the advantages?
  • Introduction to college work load
  • Credits go toward college which will create a lighter work load per semester, flexibility for a minor or allow you to graduate a semester or year early
  • Explore career fields before starting college
How much do High School Dual Enrollment courses cost?

$150 per credit = $450 per class

This is a significant saving over traditional tuition costs.

Who can participate in High School Dual Enrollment?

High school juniors and seniors with a 3.0 or higher GPA who are accepted into the program.

Can I study online or on campus?

Both!

When are classes offered?

On Campus

Two 16-week semesters: August to December and January to May

Online

Five 8-week sessions: starting in January, March, May, August and October

How many classes can I take?

You may take one 8-week session or two per 16-week semester.

Can I receive both college and high school credit?

College credit should not be an issue as long as the course is required for your major. High school credit is based on your high school’s policy.

How will dual enrollment affect my GPA?

High school GPA is based on the high school’s discrepancy. College as a high schooler is similar to that of a regular college student. Your grade will impact your college GPA. If you attend CSU, that is the GPA that will continue with you. Outside CSU, typically a C or better will transfer wherever God is leading you.

Who can help me with dual enrollment and choosing my classes?

Initially, your admissions counselor will walk you through options. Once you are enrolled, you will be assigned an advisor to assist you through the rest of your time as a dual enrolled student.

Miriam

Early Childhood Ed. major,
Meshoppen, PA

 

The biggest benefit of the online classes is that I could complete the coursework from anywhere. I could even complete the forums through the Schoology app on my phone, which allowed me to take my education anywhere my family was going. The classes were a great introduction to college work, especially since I could message the professors any time to ask questions.

 

                                                                                                       

homeschool student at CSU
Left Menu Icon
Clarks Summit UniversityClarks Summit University